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Posts tagged 1900s.

Photos by Harry Whittier Frees

Illustrations by Arthur Rackham (early 1900s)

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Fritz Kreisler reportedly said after hearing a young Jascha Heifetz for the first time: "Well, I guess we might as well break our violins over our knees now" 
Jascha Heifetz and Fritz Kreisler were both born on Feb. 2 - Kreisler in 1875 and Heifetz in 1901. They each set new standards for the art of playing the violin. Kreisler’s trademark was sweetness, warmth and humanity. Meanwhile, Heifetz, through his bowing technique and superhuman speed, achieved a level of virtuosity that is still unmatched.

Did you know?

Fritz Kreisler reportedly said after hearing a young Jascha Heifetz for the first time: "Well, I guess we might as well break our violins over our knees now" 

Jascha Heifetz and Fritz Kreisler were both born on Feb. 2 - Kreisler in 1875 and Heifetz in 1901. They each set new standards for the art of playing the violin. Kreisler’s trademark was sweetness, warmth and humanity. Meanwhile, Heifetz, through his bowing technique and superhuman speed, achieved a level of virtuosity that is still unmatched.

 Girls Group portrait of prostitutes in the Shimpuro Brothel, Yokohama, possibly by Kusakabe Kimbei

Girls Group portrait of prostitutes in the Shimpuro Brothel, Yokohama, possibly by Kusakabe Kimbei

jessbennett:

Women of Protest: A Feminist History Refresher  

It wasn’t until 1920 that women were granted suffrage, but it was 1917 when members of the National Women’s Party — Alice Paul, Lucy Burns and others — picketed outside the White House, burning copies of Woodrow Wilson’s speeches and demanding the right to vote. What resulted — mass arrests (most for “obstructing traffic”), unlawful imprisonment and bloody beatings — became known as the Night of Terror, though it’s fair to say most among my generation don’t know it.

The Night of Terror took place on Nov. 15, 1917, when the warden at the Workhouse Prison, in Occoquan, Virginia, ordered his guards to teach the suffragists a lesson. For weeks, the women’s only water had come from an open pail. Their food had been infested with worms. But on this night, some 40 prison guards wielding clubs beat the women senseless — grabbing, dragging, choking, kicking and pinching them, according to affidavits recounting the attacks. 

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#1900s  #quotes  

Colour photographs of Christina O’Gorman (1913)

Rita Lydig, born Rita Hernandez de Alba de Acosta, was an American socialite regarded as “the most picturesque woman in America”, photo by Edward Steichen (1913)

Rita Lydig, born Rita Hernandez de Alba de Acosta, was an American socialite regarded as “the most picturesque woman in America”, photo by Edward Steichen (1913)

Child workers in Mississippi, by Lewis Hine (1911)

Child workers in Mississippi, by Lewis Hine (1911)

Mäda Primavesi, by Gustav Klimt (1912)

Mäda Primavesi, by Gustav Klimt (1912)

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Sentō (銭湯) is a Japanese communal public bath house. Traditionally these bath houses have been quite utilitarian, with one large room separating the sexes by a tall barrier, usually a minimum of lined up faucets and a single large bath for the already washed bathers to sit in among others.

Now these bath houses have been decreasing in numbers as more Japanese residences have their own baths. Some Japanese find social importance in going to public baths, out of the theory that physical intimacy brings emotional intimacy, which is termed skinship.

The origins of the Japanese sentō and the Japanese bathing culture in general can be traced to the Buddhist temples in India, from where it spread to China, and finally to Japan during the Nara period.

Image of Sentō (1901)

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Japanese woman in kimono (ca. 1870)

Japanese woman in kimono (ca. 1870)

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Carter Godwin Woodson lived from December 19, 1875 – April 3, 1950, he was an African-American historian, author, journalist and the founder of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History.

He completed his Ph.D. in history at Harvard University in 1912, where he was the second African-American (after W.E.B. DuBois) to earn a doctorate. Dr. Woodson has been cited as the father of black history.

In 1926, Woodson pioneered the celebration of “Negro History Week”, designated for the second week in February, to coincide with marking the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. The week of recognition became accepted and has been extended as the full month of February, now known as Black History Month.

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"Fights in Berlin’s Newspaper street", photo by Willy Römer (1919)

"Fights in Berlin’s Newspaper street", photo by Willy Römer (1919)

The first compact camera from Ur-Leica (for Lei(tzsche) Camera)

The first compact camera from Ur-Leica (for Lei(tzsche) Camera)

Charlie Chaplin in “The Champion” (1915)

Charlie Chaplin in “The Champion” (1915)